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Ziplocs are the biggest misstep,” said Julie Corbett, a mother in Oakland, Calif., whose two girls attend a school with an eco-friendly lunch policy. In school years past, she said, many a morning came unhinged when the girls were sent to school with disposable sandwich bags.

“That’s when the kids have meltdowns, because they don’t want to be shamed at school,” Ms. Corbett said. “It’s a big deal.”

The Plastic Sandwich Bag Flunks,” New York Times. 

1. Childhood faux pas are a key economic driver these days, apparently.

2. In the second-to-last paragraph, we learn that this woman has started an eco-friendly packaging company. I would have liked to have known that earlier in the story. So is this woman so concerned about the social taboo of Ziplocs because she doesn’t want her kids to be ostracized or because it’s her business?

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The drive takes maybe five minutes. The Gateway Arch looms large. But the big city feels far away, like a vast distance has passed, like the mighty river is a moat for keeping secrets at bay and filled with baptismal waters for washing reputations clean on the drive home.
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Conversating on the 44 bus in San Fran
Young female Outside Lands festivalgoer: California is my favorite state. Well, except Hawaii.
Young male Outside Lands festivalgoer: Hawaii isn't really a state. It's an ... awesome bonus state.
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Mr. Johnson, a vegetarian, does his limited cooking on a hot plate. He uses no gas or oil. He does not have a water heater, but if he needs to take a sponge bath, he can warm up his water by running it through a rooftop convection system made of hundreds of old tuna cans that are heated by the sun.
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Haast was a terrific showman who dressed in white as if he were a distinguished scientist. He was actually a former carnival worker who had once roomed with a moonshiner at a speakeasy.
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Florida’s snake man made living from deadly serpents

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Understanding who we are and how we came to be the way we are? That’s not Googlable now, and I hope it never will be.
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The youngest of seven children, Huguette Marcelle Clark was the daughter of a scoundrel.
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It turned out that 95 percent of the credit card transactions for the spam-advertised drugs and herbal remedies they bought were handled by just three financial companies …

If a handful of companies like these refused to authorize online credit card payments to the merchants, “you’d cut off the money that supports the entire spam enterprise.”

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My angle on every subject is that it’s more complicated than you think. The job is to get people to look beyond the caricature and the stereotype and understand — or at least accept that there are other dimensions. Because that’s the beginning of when you start to understand things.
New York Times Executive Editor Bill Keller, speaking in an interview with photojournalists Joao Silva and Greg Marinovich.
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It snows up there in New York City, doesn’t it?” asked Mr. Melancon’s father-in-law, Floyd Harrington, 81. “How come all those people don’t move?
New York Times story on Cajuns facing flooding, which opens with the statement, “you do not really want to ask a Cajun why he lives in a swamp, especially when he is packing everything he owns because the very swamp he loves is about to swallow up his house.”